YAKNEHAZ


YAKNEHAZ
YAKNEHAZ (pseudonym of Isaiah-Nissan Hakohen Goldberg; 1858–1927), Yiddish and Hebrew writer. Born in a village near Minsk, Yaknehaz began, in 1878, writing Yiddish and Hebrew literary essays which aroused great interest. A decade later, sholem aleichem reprinted the most famous of these, A Brif fun Lite keyn Amerike ("Letter from Lithuania to America"), in which, as in hundreds of later tales and sketches, Yaknehaz portrayed the life of the small Jewish town in a simple unsophisticated style. He was popular among the masses for almost half a century. His influence on young abraham reisen was considerable. After the Russian Revolution, he continued to publish in the Soviet Yiddish periodicals. The government of Soviet Belorussia granted him a pension. His collections of stories appeared in Minsk in 1940–41. -BIBLIOGRAPHY: Rejzen, Leksikon, 1 (1926), 1273–75; LNYL, 4 (1961), 271f; Kressel, Leksikon, 1 (1965), 413f. (Shlomo Bickel and Sol Liptzin / Gennady Estraikh (2nd ed.)

Encyclopedia Judaica. 1971.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • YAKNEHAZ — (Heb. יַקְנְהַ״ז), abbreviation composed of the initials of the Hebrew words; יַיִן yayin ( wine ), קִדּוּשׁ kiddush ( sanctification ), נֵר ner ( light ), הַבְדָּלָה havdalah ( separation ), and זְמַן zeman ( time, meaning blessing of the time,… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Yaknehaz (Goldberg, Isaiah N.) — (1858 1927)    Lithuanian and Yiddish author. He was a teacher in Lithuania from 1880, and served as permanent assistant on the Hebrew newspaper Ha Melitz. He wrote stories and sketches for the Hebrew and Yiddish press …   Dictionary of Jewish Biography

  • ABBREVIATIONS — The abbreviation of words originated in antiquity, probably soon after the alphabet developed from ideographic pictures. While originally rare, their use increased with the general growth in the transmission of ideas by writing. They relieved the …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • HAVDALAH — (Heb. הַבְדָּלָה; distinction ), blessing recited at the termination of Sabbaths and festivals, in order to emphasize the distinction between the sacred and the ordinary, with regard to the Sabbath (or festival) that is departing and the or  … …   Encyclopedia of Judaism


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